Change your diet to save both water and your health

September 10, 2018
Source: European Commission Joint Research Centre

Summary: Shifting to a healthy diet is not only good for us, but it also saves a lot of fresh water, according to a new study. Compared to existing diets, the water required to produce our food could be reduced by up to 55 percent for healthy pescetarian and vegetarian diets.Shifting to a healthy diet is not only good for us, but it also saves a lot of precious fresh water, according to a new study by the JRC published in Nature Sustainability.

sustainable diet info graphic for article, Change your diet to save both water and your healthCompared to existing diets, the water required to produce our food could be reduced by between 11% and 35% for healthy diets containing meat, 33% and 55% for healthy pescetarian diets and 35% and 55% for healthy vegetarian diets.

Researchers compared these three diet patterns, defined by respective national dietary guidelines, to the current actual food consumption, using available data from more than 43 thousand areas in France, the UK and Germany.

They found that eating more healthily could substantially reduce the water footprint of people’s diets, consistent across all the geographical entities analysed in the study.

The study is the most detailed nationwide food consumption-related water footprint ever made, taking into account socio-economic factors of food consumption, for existing and recommended diets.

Influences on the food we eat

The scientists also show how individual food consumption behaviour — and their related water footprints — depend strongly on the socio-economic factors like age, gender and education level.

They found interesting correlations between such factors and both the water footprint of specific foods and their resulting impact on overall water footprints.

For example, the study shows how in France, the water footprint of milk consumption decreases with age across the municipalities analysed.

Across London, they show a strong correlation between the water footprint of wine consumption and the percentage of the population of each area with a high education level.

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

New blood pressure app

September 7, 2018
Source: Michigan State University

Summary: Researchers have invented a proof-of-concept blood pressure app that can give accurate readings using an iPhone — with no special equipment.Michigan State University has invented a proof-of-concept blood pressure app that can give accurate readings using an iPhone — with no special equipment.

smartphone app screen for article, New blood pressure appThe discovery, featured in the current issue of Scientific Reports, was made by a team of scientists led by Ramakrishna Mukkamala, MSU electrical and computer engineering professor.

“By leveraging optical and force sensors already in smartphones for taking ‘selfies’ and employing ‘peek and pop,’ we’ve invented a practical tool to keep tabs on blood pressure,” he said. “Such ubiquitous blood pressure monitoring may improve hypertension awareness and control rates, and thereby help reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality.”

In a publication in Science Translational Medicine earlier this year, Mukkamala’s team had proposed the concept with the invention of a blood pressure app and hardware. With the combination of a smartphone and add-on optical and force sensors, the team produced a device that rivaled arm-cuff readings, the standard in most medical settings.

With advances in smartphones, the add-on optical and force sensors may no longer be needed. Peek and pop, available to users looking to open functions and apps with a simple push of their finger, is now standard on many iPhones and included in some Android models.

If things keep moving along at the current pace, an app could be available in late 2019, Mukkamala added.

“Like our original device, the application still needs to be validated in a standard regulatory test,” he said. “But because no additional hardware is needed, we believe that the app could reach society faster.”

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

Conservative Care for Shoulders

By Mary O’Donoghue, Chief Clinical and Product Officer, MedRisk

 BY 

Mary O’Donoghue, Chief Clinical and Product Officer, MedRiskShoulder pain is one the most common musculoskeletal problems in workers’ compensation, second only to low back pain. In fact, it is even more prevalent in some industries. Like low back pain, shoulder pain has been shown to respond well to conservative care, especially physically therapy.

Strenuous work, including heavy lifting over a long period of time, carrying, pulling, or pushing can cause shoulder pain and problems. The type of repetitive overhead arm motion that warehouse workers, flight attendants and construction workers perform also contributes to shoulder issues.

Symptoms include pain at rest and when lifting and lowering the arm or with specific movements. Some patients feel weakness when lifting or rotating the shoulder or experience a crackling sensation when moving the shoulder in certain positions. Limited range of motion and/or pain associated with internal and external rotation and forward flexion can indicate a partial thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Another symptom is painful abduction, which is the movement away from the median plane of the body. Full-thickness tears are indicated by weakness of external rotation and abduction.

Until recently, surgery was the common approach to rotator cuff tears and similar shoulder injuries. Now, guided by research, clinicians are adopting more conservative methods. This usually involves a combination of physical therapy and temporarily modifying activity, such as avoiding heavy lifting or sustained overhead use of the arms.

[SEE REST OF STORY HERE]

12 Frequent Hard Hat Questions

If the hard hat has sustained an impact, dispose of it immediately, even if the damage is not visible.

workers with hardhats for article, Twelve Frequent Hard Hat Questions

Protecting employees from potential head injuries is a key element of a safety program in virtually all industries. The primary reasons for an organization to require hard hats in the work environment is to help protect employees from head trauma from objects falling from above; bumping into fixed objects, such as pipes or beams; or contact with electrical hazards. Head protection also can serve to help protect employees from splashes, rain, high heat, and exposure to ultraviolet light.

In this article, we will discuss many of the frequently asked questions related to hard hats.

When Is a Hard Hat Required?
OSHA requires, in 29 CFR 1910.135, that if the following hazardous conditions are present, then head protection is required:

  • Objects might fall from above and strike employees on the head
  • There is potential for employees to bump their heads against fixed objects, such as exposed pipes or beams
  • There is a possibility of accidental head contact with electrical hazards

Other countries or organizations may have additional requirements, but most regulations are hazard based and start with a thorough workplace hazard assessment.

What Industry Standard or Approval Do Hard Hats Need?
This can vary by country or global region because there are various standards in place. In North America, the current standards are the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard for Head Protection, Z89.1 (current version is 2009) and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Industrial Protective Headwear, Z94.1 (current version is 2005). These two standards share the “Type” and “Class” descriptors, which makes it easier to ensure that the right hard hats are selected for your application. However, as you will see below, the tests are slightly different, so a hard hat manufacturer must test to all standards that it chooses to meet, based upon the markets in which it wants to sell.

[SEE REST OF THE STORY HERE]

90% of Americans use digital health tools, survey shows

Author:  Aug. 29, 2018

Dive Brief:
Consumers continue to embrace digital health tools, with 90% of respondents in a new Rock Health survey using at least one last year, up from 80% in 2016.
photo of person with a smart watch, smart phone and health apps for article, 90% of Americans use digital health tools, survey showsThe greatest adoption is occurring around online health information (79% vs. 72%) and online provider reviews (58% vs. 51%). A slower uptick was seen in mobile tracking (24% vs. 22%), while wearables held steady at 24% and live video televisits slipped three percentage points to 19%.
But while 77% of people prefer in-person doctor visits to telehealth, most who used video visits were satisfied with the experience. Among those who paid for their virtual encounter, 91% said they were satisfied. That number dropped to 62% when someone else paid.

Dive Insight:
Likewise, while not everyone is jumping at the idea of wearables, those who use them report progress meeting personal health goals. The chief reasons people use wearables are to track physical activity, lose weight, improve sleep and manage stress.

The tools for doing so are proliferating, with mobile operating systems and various apps offering to track the information. Fitibit has been upping the ante, and recently launched a product line update that includes detection of blood oxygen levels, goal-based exercise modes and a sleep tracking beta.

[SEE REST OF THE STORY HERE]

How to Use HIPAA to Obtain Timely Medical Records

Are you hip to HIPAA?

August 27, 2018 by 

Members of the claims management team obtain medical records on a frequent basis when investigating workers’ compensation claims. It is important they do this promptly given the many constraints of workers’ compensation laws. Given the nature of these requests, state and federal privacy laws come into play. Failure to understand these laws and their requirements can lead to delay and problems down the road. Now is the time to better understand these laws and how to incorporate them into your team’s best practices.

It All Starts with HIPAA

HIPAA logo for article, How to Use HIPAA to Obtain Timely Medical RecordsThe Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) serves as the basis for healthcare privacy and the dissemination of medical records in the United States. The law was enacted in 1996 to address the many issues medical providers were facing and to protect the privacy of all individuals. In essence, it serves as the baseline for standards enacted at the state level for all covered entities.

Understanding the Basics of HIPAA

To understand the law, it is important to understand when it applies and whom it protects. HIPAA applies to all “covered entities,” which are defined under 45 C.F.R. §160.103, as:

Health care providers who transmit “protected health information;”

Entities that process personal health information (healthcare clearinghouses);

Health plans such as Group Health Plans; and

Any business partner of a “covered entity.”

It is also important to note that the federal law applies to “protected health information,” otherwise known as PHI. This is information defined under 45 C.F.R. §164.501, which is individually identifiable health information maintained or transmitted in any form, whether electronically, on paper or orally.

Exceptions to HIPAA in Work Comp

Employees at healthcare providers are required to know and understand HIPAA and have a duty to protect a patient’s PHI. Continue reading How to Use HIPAA to Obtain Timely Medical Records

8 ways hospitals are cutting readmissions

Written by Megan Knowles | August 15, 2018 | Print  | Email

As hospitals work to reduce readmissions, healthcare experts are looking at why patients return to the hospital and strategizing ways to keep discharged patients from becoming inpatients again, according to U.S. News & World Report.

1. Rapid follow-up. Congestive heart failure patients are some of the patients who have the highest risk of early hospital readmission, and patients who see a physician soon after their hospital stay or receive a follow up from a nurse or pharmacist are less likely to be readmitted, a study published in Medical Care found.

graph of top causes for hospital readmissionAfter researchers looked at about 11,000 heart failure patients discharged over a 10-year period, they found the timing of follow-up is closely tied to readmission rates, said study co-author Keane Lee, MD. “Specifically, it should be done within seven days of hospital discharge to be effective at reducing readmissions within 30 days,” Dr. Lee said.

2. Empathy training. When clinicians are trained in empathy skills, they may better communicate with patients preparing for discharge, and encouraging two-way conversations may help patients reveal their care expectations and concerns. Providers at Cleveland Clinic, for example, receive empathy training to better engage with patients and their families.

3. Treating the whole patient. When a patient suffers from multiple medical conditions, catching and treating symptoms of either condition early may prevent an emergency room visit. Integrated care models make it easier to give patients all-encompassing, continuous care, said Alan Go, MD, director of comprehensive clinical research at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif.

4. Navigator teams. A patient navigator team of a nurse and pharmacist can help cut heart failure patient readmissions. Patients who are discharged may be overwhelmed by long medication lists and multiple outpatient appointments. A patient navigator team of a nurse and pharmacist can help cut heart failure patient readmissions.

One study examined results of these teams at New York City-based Montefiore Medical Center. The navigator team helped reduce 30-day readmission rates by providing patient education, scheduling follow-up appointments and emphasizing patient frailty or struggle to comprehend discharge instructions.

5. Diabetes home monitoring. For high-risk patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease, home monitoring can help avoid readmissions. In a study examining a Medicare Advantage program of telephonic diabetes disease management, nurses conducted regular phone assessments of patients’ diabetes symptoms, medication-taking and self-monitoring of glucose levels. The study found hospital admissions for any cause were reduced for the program’s patients.

6. Empowered patients. It is critical for patients to understand their care plan at discharge, including medications, physical therapy and follow-up appointments, said Andrew Ryan, PhD, professor of healthcare management at the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor. “Patients don’t want to be readmitted, either,” Dr. Ryan said. “They can take an active role in coordinating their care. Ideally, they wouldn’t have to be the only ones to do that.”

[SEE REST OF STORY HERE]

How Facebook — yes, Facebook — might make MRIs faster

Facebook’s artificial intelligence lab is working with New York University’s medical school to make MRI exams 10 times faster, which, if successful, would allow radiologists to complete a test in minutes.

  @mattmcfarlandAugust 20, 2018: 11:14 AM ET

Doctors use MRI — shorthand for magnetic resonance imaging — to get a closer look at organs, tissues and bones without exposing patients to harmful radiation. The image quality makes them especially helpful in spotting soft tissue damage, too. The problem is, tests can take as long as an hour. Anyone with even a hint of claustrophobia can struggle to remain perfectly still in the tube-like machine that long. Tying up a machine for that long also drives up costs by limiting the number of exams a hospital can perform each day.

photo of high speed MRI machine for article, How Facebook -- yes, Facebook -- might make MRIs fasterComputer scientists at Facebook (FB) think they can use machine learning to make things a lot faster. To that end, NYU is providing an anonymous dataset of 10,000 MRI exams, a trove that will include as many as three million images of knees, brains and livers.

Researchers will use the data to train an algorithm, using a method called deep learning, to recognize the arrangement of bones, muscles, ligaments, and other things that make up the human body. Building this knowledge into the software that powers an MRI machine will allow the AI to create a portion of the image, saving time.

“You could be in and out in five minutes. It would be a real game-changer.” Daniel Sodickson, vice chair for research in radiology at NYU School of Medicine, told CNNMoney.

{SEE FULL ARTICLE HERE}

To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit

My back hurts when I sit down.

It’s been going on for 10 years. It really doesn’t matter where I am — at work, at a restaurant, even on our couch at home. My lower back screams, “Stop sitting!”

To try to reduce the pain, I bought a kneeling chair at work. Then I got a standing desk. Then I went back to a regular chair because standing became painful.

spinal gif animation for article, To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You SitI’ve seen physical therapists, orthopedic surgeons and pain specialists. I’ve mastered Pilates, increased flexibility and strengthened muscles. At one point, my abs were so strong my husband nicknamed them “the plate.”

All these treatments helped a bit, at first. But the pain never really went away. So a few years ago, I decided to accept reality: Sitting down is — and will always be — painful for me.

Then back in November, I walked into the studio of Jenn Sherer in Palo Alto, Calif. She is part of a growing movement on the West Coast to teach people to move and sit and stand as they did in the past — and as they still do in other parts of the world. For the past 8 years, Sherer has been helping people reduce their back pain.

I was interviewing Sherer for a story about bending. But she could tell I was in pain. So I told her my story.

Her response left me speechless: “Sitting is a place where you can find heaven in your joints and in your back,” she says. “It’s not sitting that’s causing the pain, it’s how you’re sitting.

“Do you want me to show you how?”

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]