Tag Archives: app

SmokerStop App Review: A Motivational Tool for Your Patients

Douglas Maurer, DO/MPH/FAAFP | August 2, 2018

Tobacco use remains the #1 preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. Overall, cigarette smoking among U.S. adults (aged ≥18 years) declined from 20.9 percent in 2005 to 15.5 percent in 2016. Still nearly 38 million

smoking cessation info graphic for article, SmokerStop App Review: A Motivational Tool for Your PatientsAmerican adults smoked cigarettes in 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smoking remains the leading cause of cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). National efforts have included tobacco taxes and smoking bans which have both proven effective.

More recently, the prescribing of apps for cessation has been utilized and shown to be effective. We recently reviewed and praised the outstanding QuitMedKit from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The app includes nearly everything the primary provider would want to have to aid patients in tobacco cessation: the 5A’s approach, information on medications for cessation, tips on motivational interviewing, graphics to assist in cessation, and links to online resources.

The QuitMedKit app does not include much information tailored to patients regarding personal health and financial goals. The SmokerStop app by Dr Titus Brinker in Germany uses personal motivation as its primary smoking cessation technique. The app uses data input by the patient to calculate health information such as reduction in blood pressure, lung cancer risk, as well as financial goals such as when an ex-smoker will have enough cash for movie tickets, an iPhone, etc. The app also allows patients to put in their own goals. All of this information is tracked by the app and reminders are periodically sent to to the patient to help keep them motivated.

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

QuitMedKit: An Essential Guide to Tobacco Cessation App

Douglas Maurer, DO/MPH/FAAFP | 

Tobacco use remains the #1 preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. Overall, cigarette smoking among U.S. adults (aged ≥18 years) declined from 20.9 percent in 2005 to 15.5 percent in 2016. Still, nearly 38 million American adults smoked cigarettes in 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Screenshot of app for article, QuitMedKit: An Essential Guide to Tobacco Cessation App
And it’s FREE!

Smoking remains the leading cause of cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Efforts to promote tobacco cessation are encouraged at the national, state, local, and individual practice level. The CDC reports only California and Alaska spend the recommended amount on tobacco cessation.

National efforts have included tobacco taxes and smoking bans which have both proven effective. Efforts to prevent the initiation of tobacco use in youths include Tar Wars from the AAFP. More recently, the prescribing of apps for cessation has been utilized and shown to be effective. I have studied the Smartquit app myself via a randomized controlled trial in the military population (unpublished data) served by our residency program. What are the options for providers just wanting to counsel patients outside of a research study and/or paying for a smoking cessation app to prescribe?

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has just released a new app called QuitMedGuide. The app was developed by Alexander V. Prokhorov, MD, PhD and Mario Luca, MS, at MD Anderson. The app is intended to assist healthcare providers in counseling and treatment of tobacco dependence. The app includes the evidence-based 5As approach, information on medications for cessation, tips on motivational interviewing, graphics to assist in cessation, and links to online resources.

Evidence-based medicine

Developed by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, QuitMedKit uses the current 2008 US Department of Health and Human Services Clinical Practice Guideline for tobacco cessation. The app includes detailed information on the proven 5As approach to cessation, tips on motivational interviewing, and current FDA-approved medications for tobacco cessation.

Who would benefit from this App?

Medical students, primary care physicians, midlevels, hospital medicine physicians, nurses, pharmacists, or any provider who counsels patients on tobacco cessation.

[SEE ORIGINAL STORY HERE]

New Smartphone Apps Help Reinforce Workplace Safety, Train Teen Workers

They had me at training a teen!

By WorkersCompensation.com  February 23, 2017

Workplace Safety app for iOS and Android
   There’s a YouTube video that shows how to use the app.

Tumwater, WA – Improving workplace safety just got easier with two new free apps available from the Department of Labor & Industries (L&I). They were developed with grant money awarded by L&I’s Safety and Health Investment Projects (SHIP) Program. Both can be downloaded for IOS or Android devices.

The SHIP Program funds innovative projects that prevent workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities and help injured workers return to work.

“We hope all employers will give these apps a try,” said Jenifer Jellison, program manager for L&I’s SHIP grant program. “They’re convenient, easy to use in the workplace, and offer a great new way to prevent injuries and reinforce safe work practices.”

Capture and report safety incidents instantly

The Good Observation, Near-Miss and Accident Reporting app provides a simple and effective way to document safety incidents in the workplace. Employers can use it to photograph a safe practice, a near-miss or an accident, and then use the finger-drawing tool to markup the photo. A quick-report feature lets you save the photo, add a few details and send to others in your organization.

This new workplace safety tool was developed by three companies working together — John W. Shervey & Associates, Schuchart Construction and Mellora — using a $45,735 SHIP grant.

The app is suitable for most industries and can be used for training, hazard recognition, risk analysis or process improvement. There’s also a Spanish version, and there’s a YouTube video that shows how to use the app. Download the app at WA-HSEQ app.

[READ FULL STORY HERE]

Antimicrobial Companion App: Promotes Antibiotic Stewardship

Douglas Maurer, DO/MPH/FAAFP | August 29, 2016

anti bacaterial helper app for prescribing physiciansAntibiotic resistance is a growing problem. According to the CDC, over 2 million each year becomes infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. Over 23,000 of these people die of their infections due to the lack of an effective antimicrobial.

We have recently seen the discovery of so-called “superbugs” such as colistin-resistant E. coli in multiple facilities across the United States that makes methicillin-resistant Staph aureus look like a harmless fly. Multiple studies have shown that antibiotic

overprescribing is a common problem in primary care, where over 90% of antibiotics are prescribed. In the US, the CDC is leading the charge promoting antibiotic stewardship. The CDC has launched numerous online tools as part of a playbook of core elements to combat antimicrobial resistance. The Joint Commission is evaluating hospitals on their antibiotic stewardship programs as part of their accreditation processes. Continue reading Antimicrobial Companion App: Promotes Antibiotic Stewardship

Top 10 Apps Physicians Recommend to Their Patients

From: Modern Medicine Network

screen shot of iTriage app1.  iTriage – Health, Doctor, Symptoms, and Healthcare Search: Patients now have access to an endless amount of health information right in their pockets. This app allows them to check their symptoms and easily locate a physician or hospital in the event of an emergency.

2.  Diabetes App – Blood Sugar Control, Glucose Tracker, and Carb Counter: Outside of the physician’s office, patients with diabetes often struggle to monitor their condition. This app provides a food database for patients to track their consumption. It also allows physicians to monitor any fluctuations. The price is $6.99, but a lite version is available for free.  

3.  iCookbook Diabetic – Recipes and nutritional information plus health articles for people with diabetes: When it comes to cooking healthy, patients may need some inspiration. Developed by dietitians, this app provides diabetic-friendly recipes, as well as tools for meal planning and grocery shopping.

4.  Diabetes in Check

5.  Glucose Companion

6.  Blood Pressure Monitor – Family Lite

7.  HeartWise Blood Pressure Tracker

8.  Mayo Clinic Health Community

9.  Tummy Trends – Constipation and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Tracker

10.  iCalcRisk

[READ FULL STORY HERE]

“Hot” New App from OSHA!

graphic with iPhone and flames on words "Hot Apps" OSHA Releases Mobile App To Help Protect Workers From Heat-Related Illnesses

As part of continuing educational efforts by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration about the dangers of extreme heat, Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis today announced a free application for mobile devices that will enable workers and supervisors to monitor the heat index at their work sites in order to prevent heat-related illnesses.

“Summer heat presents a serious issue that affects some of the most vulnerable workers in our country, and education is crucial to keeping them safe,” said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. “Heat-related illnesses are preventable. This new app is just one way the Labor Department is getting that message out.”

The app, available in English and Spanish, combines heat index data from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with the user’s location to determine necessary protective measures. Based on the risk level of the heat index, the app provides users with information about precautions they make take such as drinking fluids, taking rest breaks and adjusting work operations. Users also can review the signs and symptoms of heat stroke, heat exhaustion and other heat-related illnesses, and learn about first aid steps to take in an emergency. Information for supervisors is also available through the app on how to gradually build up the workload for new workers as well as how to train employees on heat illness signs and symptoms. Additionally, users can contact OSHA directly through the app.

The app is designed for devices using an Android platform, and versions for BlackBerry and iPhone users will be released shortly. To download it, visit http://go.usa.gov/KFE

More than 30 workers died from heat stroke in 2010. Thousands become ill from heat exhaustion and other heat illnesses every year. Some of the highest illness rates occur among construction workers, farmworkers, roofers, landscapers, baggage handlers and other air transportation workers.

Effective heat illness prevention requires simple planning. Employers are responsible for protecting workers by providing plenty of water, scheduling rest breaks in the shade or air-conditioned spaces, planning heavy work early in the day, preparing for medical emergencies, training workers about heat and other job hazards, taking steps to help workers – especially those who are new to working outdoors or who have been away from work for a period of time – acclimatize to the heat, and gradually increasing workloads or allowing more frequent breaks during the first week of an outdoor project.

Information for employers about using the heat index to calculate and address risks posed to workers also is available through OSHA’s new Web-based tool “Using the Heat Index: Employer Guidance,” which is accessible at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/index.html. OSHA’s other educational and training tools about heat illnesses prevention, available in English and Spanish, can be found at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html .

“OSHA’s prevention message is clear: Water. Rest. Shade. These are three little words that make a big difference for outdoor workers during the hot summer months,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels.