Tag Archives: EMR

How Apple’s Health Records Could Reshape Patient Engagement

Dignity Health’s chief digital officer explains why he thinks Apple can succeed for population health and precision medicine efforts where other PHR launches have not.

By Mike Miliard     April 18, 2018     09:46 AM

As a longtime collaborator with Apple – since before it even beta-tested its Health Records project, live now at 39 hospitals – San Francisco-based Dignity Health is in sync with the iPhone developer’s vision, said Shez Partovi, MD.

screensnap of Apple's personal health record feature with iOS 11.3.
A screensnap of Apple’s personal health record feature with iOS 11.3.

“We had been working with Apple prior to their initial announcement for some time,” said Partovi, chief digital officer and senior vice president of digital transformation at Dignity Health. “We’d been working with them for a while because we’re aligned in our philosophies of empowering patients by giving them their data.”

As part of the Health Records launch, Dignity will leverage HL7’s FHIR standard to securely move patients’ health data from own electronic health record system to the iPhones of patients using iOS 11.3 – enabling them manage meds, labs, allergies, conditions and more, and notifying them when the health system makes changes to their health information.

[Also: Apple reveals 39 hospitals to launch Apple Health Records]

“When you think of personalized medicine, you can think about caring for yourself in two dimensions,” said Partovi. “There’s care management, where a health system or physician or team is managing your care, and there’s self-management.”

For those patients managing an illness or a chronic condition, “a big part of your life is self-managing that condition,” he said.

Luckily, nowadays there are “more and more tools out there that will be enhanced if they have your data.” A tool like Apple’s Health Records, that puts valuable EHR data right onto a person’s smartphone, can only be a boon.

“That, for us, has always been the philosophy,” said Partovi. “We recognize that a lot of care happens outside the four walls of a health system. And we believe that for healthy populations we need to give patients their data.”

Picking up where Google left off

The idea of personal health record is nothing new, of course. Most providers offer at least a basic patient portal that can be accessed via computer or smartphone, although utilization of them remains underwhelming.

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

Microsoft Adds Health Privacy Features to Office 2016

October 12, 2015 | Tom Sullivan – Executive Editor, HIMSS Media

graphic with all the app icons for Microsoft Office 2016When Microsoft unwrapped the latest version of its Office suite, the company injected the software with data privacy and security features specifically designed for healthcare customers.

Practice managers and IT staff, particularly existing users of Microsoft’s apps, might want to know about these.

Here are three of those:

1. PHI recognition: Outlook can now recognize protected health information in an attachment and warn the user before sending to avoid the common mishap of PHI landing in the inbox of someone who should not receive it. And different permissions can be set to stop some users from even sending PHI at all.

2. Smart Attachments: This feature gives users the option of sending a link in lieu of heavy documents that consume a lot of memory. The reason that matters: When clinicians send a link via OneDrive for Business, the security mechanism authenticates the user and Exchange can track whether a recipient even clicked on that link – which could help account for what happens should data be sent to unintended recipients.

3. Encryption, single sign-on and authentication: This is kind of a threefer, admittedly. They are connected enough to group together. In addition to Office, Microsoft injected encryption into Office 365 services, so now both documents and emails are encrypted, while Windows Hello serves as a single sign-on capability and Windows Passport is now being used by third-party apps, such as Allscripts EMR, for facial recognition.

Office 2016 comes on the heels of Windows 10, which also brought new features for healthcare.

Continue reading Microsoft Adds Health Privacy Features to Office 2016

Patients, Docs Don’t See Eye to Eye Regarding EMR Access

doctor viewing patient record on iPadSeptember 16, 2013 | Bernie Monegain – Editor

A new survey finds that with patient engagement efforts on the rise, a mounting number of U.S. citizens — 41 percent to be precise — are more privy to changing doctors based on their ability to gain online access to their own electronic medical records. Meanwhile, doctors remain skeptical of lending patients that type of unabridged EMR access.

The survey, of more than 9,000 people in nine countries, shows that only about a third of U.S. consumers (36 percent) currently have full access to their EMR, but more than half (57 percent) have taken ownership of their record by self-tracking their personal health information, including their health history (37 percent), physical activity (34 percent) and health indicators (33 percent), such as blood pressure and weight.

“The rise of meaningful use mandates and a growing trend of self-care among consumers is shifting the role of an EMR from a mere clinical repository to a platform for shared decision-making among consumers and doctors,” said Kaveh Safavi, MD, managing director of Accenture’s North America health business. “Just as consumers can self-manage most other aspects of their lives, they expect to take greater ownership of their medical care, and they are willing to switch to doctors who share their values and are willing to provide access to consumer records.”

Roughly four out of five consumers (84 percent) surveyed believe they should have full access to their electronic medical record while only a third of physicians (36 percent) share this belief. In contrast, the majority of U.S. doctors (65 percent) say patients should only have limited access to their records and that is what most individuals (63 percent) say they currently have.

“When consumers are part of the record-keeping process, it can increase their understanding of conditions, improve motivation and serve as a clear differentiator for clinical care,” added Safavi.

Accenture conducted an online survey of 9,015 adults ages 18 and older to assess consumer perceptions of their medical providers’ electronic capabilities across nine countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, France, Germany, Singapore, Spain and the United States. The survey, which included 1,000 U.S. consumers, was fielded by Harris Interactive in July 2013. Where relevant, the survey compares select findings from the Accenture Doctors Survey to compare the doctor and consumer responses.

This article is based on original reporting from Healthcare IT News. 

– See more at: http://www.medicalpracticeinsider.com/news/patients-docs-dont-see-eye-eye-regarding-emr-access#sthash.UKEmGbGV.dpuf