Tag Archives: worker safety

Every Worker Deserves to Make it Home Safe – Every Day

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 5,190 people – more than 14 a day – died while doing their jobs in 2016. And, for every worker lost, countless loved ones, co-workers and friends are affected.

 

For more than 100 years, the National Safety Council has been a leader in workplace safety, and we believe we can eliminate preventable deaths in our lifetime. Workers’ Memorial Day on April 28 reminds us that we still have a long way to go. Despite all the advances that have been made in safety, for the first time in nearly a decade, workplace deaths have surpassed 5,000.

Implementing Safety Measures can Save Lives

NSC Safety training builds skills needed to save lives:

For more than 100 years, the National Safety Council has been a leader in workplace safety. We know that employers who show they care about the safety of their employees see improved morale, increased productivity, lower costs and, most importantly, fewer injuries.

The OSHA-NSC Alliance

The OSHA-NSC Alliance agreement aims to prevent workplace injuries, deaths and illnesses. As part of the agreement, OSHA and NSC partner to:

  • Develop compliance assistance tools and best practice documents
  • Convene, participate and exhibit at occupational safety and health forums and stakeholder meetings
  • Collaborate with other OSHA Alliance participants to address specific safety topics
  • Support and promote the Journey to Safety Excellence Campaign

WE’RE WORKING TOGETHER

Pledge to be Safe at Work

Safety is everyone’s responsibility, and you can show your commitment by taking our SafeAtWork pledge. Doing your part today can help save a life tomorrow – maybe even your own.

TAKE THE PLEDGE

Measure your Safety Progress

How is safety in your workplace progressing? The National Safety Council offers consulting and research services to help you track, evaluate and improve your safety management system.

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

6 Solutions for WC’s Compounded Medications Issue

September 26, 2018 by 

“There is no such thing as an FDA-approved compound medication.” That statement from myMatrixx Chief Clinical Officer Phil Walls underscores one of the main criticisms of these medications; while the drugs within the mixtures may all be FDA-approved, the specific combinations have not been tested and verified.

Safety is just one concern, however. The other is cost; they generally workers preparing medications for article, Compounded Medications — 6 Solutions to Address a Nagging Issue for WCare priced significantly higher than similar, FDA-approved drugs or the sum of their underlying medications.

Both the utilization and the average cost of compounded medications in the workers’ compensation system has decreased in recent years. However, there are still pockets of excessive use. Stakeholders need to maintain a steady and continued focus on efforts to curb the unnecessary use of these pharmaceuticals.

Problems Cited

Compounds are a mixture of drugs intended for a specific patient’s use. According to an FDA report, they are beneficial only in limited circumstances; such as when other medications have failed, a patient is allergic to some of the inactive ingredients or has difficulty swallowing.

The federal agency inspected compounding facilities and noted the following “troubling conditions” that could lead to widespread harm of patients:

  1. Toaster ovens used for sterilization.
  2. Pet beds near sterile compounding areas.
  3. Operators are handling sterile drug products with exposed skin, which sheds particles and bacteria, among many others.

Latest Stats

Compounded medications are not considered first-line therapy for pain or other common conditions of injured workers according to industry guidelines, such as evidence-based medicine guidelines from Work Loss Data Institute, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and many other state-specific guidelines.

Compounds are available in many applications but are used in workers’ compensation most often as topical products for pain management. Usually, compounded medications are excluded from workers’ compensation formularies, and require prior authorization before they are dispensed to an injured worker.

[SEE FULL STORY HERE]

Study Links Worker Safety and Health to Stock Market Success

By WorkersCompensation.com

cartoon of man in hsopital bed with medical and stock chart

Three recent studies suggest companies that excel at worker health and safety also thrive in stock market value.

In each study, researchers analyzed long-term stock market performances among organizations recognized for safety excellence. The findings included:

New Hires Shouldn’t Mean New Injuries

Safety Training yellow caution tapeBy   – You hire new employees with the intention of maintaining or increasing your production and profitability, but definitely not to increase your workplace injuries. Unfortunately, safety in the workplace is often overlooked on the new hire checklist. In fact, 40 percent of injured employees have been on the job less than one year (Occupational Safety and Health Administration). You can reduce your new hire risk and work comp expenses without increasing your business expenses. Let us show you how.

Why so many injuries in the first year on the job? 
There are lots of potential reasons, but some of the most common are that supervisors think new employees already have workplace safety knowledge or their previous experience accounts for any on-the-job learning curve. This way of thinking can be fatally flawed. For example, what if the new employee’s previous employer never did any formal safety training? Perhaps the new employee brings experience with them, but hasn’t worked in this field recently. Combine this with the fact that most new employees are afraid to ask questions, and it is a formula for workplace injuries.

Costly Mistakes
Introducing new faces to your workplace can bring much needed help. But they can also bring increased costs if you’re not careful. In other words, safety training pays in more ways than one.

READ COMPLETE STORY HERE

Could This Chairless Chair Cut Workers’ Comp Claims?

Could sitting down on the job reduce injuries while promoting health and productivity?

Man using chair less chair exoskeleton“In addition to resting your leg muscles, it also provides optimal posture,” Noonee’s co-founder Bryan Anastisiades tells CNN. “It keeps your back straight and can reduce the occurrence of bad postures for both healthy workers and those recovering from muscle related injuries.” A large percentage of workplace injury and illness is caused by musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), which are often as a result of poor posture, standing all day, etc.

[embedplusvideo height=”340″ width=”474″ editlink=”http://bit.ly/1zcZHRb” standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/8KSUJ9Xtw9E?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=8KSUJ9Xtw9E&width=474&height=340&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=0&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=” id=”ep7012″ /]

Both Audi and BMW will be trialing the Chairless Chair on their production lines later this year. There’s no word on pricing or general availability, but I doubt it’ll be that expensive; it’s actually a fairly simple piece of gear.Noonee is initially targeting production line workers, fruit pickers, surgeons, and other groups of workers who spend hours standing every day – but the CEO, Keith Gunura, also mentions consumer uses, such as riding on a crowded train.

Ultimately, though, I’m still a bit uncertain about how seriously we can take a company who has trademarked the term “Chairolution.”

Construction Workers, Independent Contractors, Workers’ Comp & You

December 4, 2012 By Rebecca Shafer, J.D.

sign posts with factors to consider for hiring independent contractorsWho Is and Isn’t Covered by Workers’ Comp in Construction?

Employers in the construction industry are often perplexed as to who they should cover with their workers’ compensation insurance policy.  Full-time employees are covered, but what about part-time employees, day laborers, leased employees, borrowed employees and occasional volunteer work by a family member?  In most states all of these types of employees will be covered by the workers’ compensation insurance policy.  However, independent contractors are normally excluded from coverage by the workers’ compensation insurance policy.

The issue that arises most often between independent contractors and construction company employers is when the independent contractor does not have workers’ compensation insurance of his/her own and is injured while working for the employer.  When the injury is severe and the independent contractor does not have workers’ compensation coverage, often the independent contractor will try to collect workers’ compensation benefits from the employer’s workers’ compensation insurance company.

Employers Coverage Denys Claims From Independent Contractors

The employer’s workers’ compensation insurer will normally deny the claim as the insurer has not collected any premium for the additional exposure of the independent contractor.  The independent contractor (and his/her attorney) will often turn to the Workers’ Compensation Board/Industrial Commission and ask the governing authority to rule on whether or not there is coverage for the independent contractor.

The Board or Commission will normally look closely for any reason where they can classify the independent contractor as an employee of the construction company employer.  If the employer has not complied with all the requirements of hiring the independent contractor as an independent contractor, the Board or Commission will find the injured worker to be an employee.

Construction Employers Need to Know Law

For the construction company employer to protect itself from workers’ compensation claims of independent contractors claiming workers’ compensation benefits, the employer should know the law pertaining to independent contractors in their state.  Many states follow the federal government guidelines outlined in the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  On the federal level, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled several times that there is not a single issue that makes a worker an independent contractor as opposed to an employee, but a preponderance of all the information surrounding the independent contractor-employer relationship.

Federal Fair Labor Standards Act 

Per FLSA, the following issues define whether or not the worker is an independent contractor or an employee:

1.    The extent to which the services rendered are an integral part of the principal’s business

Continue reading Construction Workers, Independent Contractors, Workers’ Comp & You

20% of Employers Not Providing Personal Protective Equipment

Workplace wear safety equipment signIs Your Company Among  the 20% of Employers Not Providing Personal Protective Equipment?

A Trades Union Congress (TUC) survey published recently reveals that despite laws which say employers must give their staff Personal Protective Equipment free of charge, more than one in five workers are being forced to pay for it out of their own pocket.

Personal Protective Equipment includes protective clothing, helmets and goggles designed to protect workers from injury, electrical hazards, heat, chemicals, and infection. More than one in 10 (11.6 percent) of those who responded to the TUC questionnaire said that although their work required them to wear safety equipment of some kind, their employer failed to provide or pay for this.

A further 8.9 percent were made to pay for any replacement equipment if their original Personal Protective Equipment was damaged. In total more than one in five (20 percent) of respondents to the survey said that they had to pay for providing or replacing all or some of the equipment they needed for their work.

Women Workers Less Likely To Have Equipment Provided than Men

Women workers were even less likely than men to have their safety equipment provided, with more than 15 percent having to provide all or some of their own attire – usually foot protection or overalls – compared to 10.5 percent of men.

The TUC said it was shocked to find that even where the employer provided Personal Protective Equipment, the worker usually had to clean the equipment themselves or pay for it to be cleaned. Of those whose equipment needed cleaning, more than three in five (60 percent) claimed that their employer made no arrangements for providing, or paying the cost of, cleaning.
Continue reading 20% of Employers Not Providing Personal Protective Equipment